Pnat, a little company in Firenze, Italy is making a big splash with their floating hydroponic garden called Jellyfish Barge. In response to the current and future problems that coastal cities are and will be seeing in regards to the shifting demands caused by climate change, water scarcity, and cultivatable land, Pnat has created an agricultural module that doesn’t require soil or rely on harmful pesticides.

 

© Studiomobile 2012

By “mimicking patterns of natural processes [that] lead to face emerging problems such as environmental changes and depletion of resources in a sustainable way. Plants account for 99% of world biomass and have been adapting to changing conditions for 450 million years. Studying their evolutionary processes suggests outstanding methodologies applicable in many fields from design to urbanism and from materials technology to resilient strategies. Pnat uses nature as a model and as a co-worker.”

© Matteo de Mayda 2014

© Matteo de Mayda 2014

 

 

The Jellyfish Barge greenhouse is a wooden base that floats on recycled plastic drums. Its hydroponic method saves around 70% of water which is produced by solar desalienation units that are able to produce 150 liters of fresh water a day from salt, polluted, or brackish water. Jellyfish Barge replicates the natural solar distillation on a smaller scale. Solar distillation is caused when the suns energy evaporates water which will then fall as pure rain water. In this way these floating greenhouses are self-sustaining and hopefully in the future we will see more of these popping up in coastal areas.